Use your imagination to hit better golf shots

“In a 1929 interview published in The Saturday Evening Post, Albert Einstein said, ‘Imagination is more important than knowledge.’ Einstein developed his theory of relativity while he was doodling, daydreaming, and letting his imagination roam the universe.

Whatever you can imagine, your subconscious mind will believe as real and translate it into action for you. The more you use your imagination to paint a vivid picture, the stronger the result is.”

Tiger Woods’ father Earl taught him to “putt to the picture” in his mind where he saw the ball rolling into the hole.

Jack Nicklaus talked about seeing every shot beforehand like he is watching a movie in his head.

Are you sending positive or negative pictures to your brain? World class golfers know to achieve the most success they use their imagination to form pictures of the results they desire.

To reinforce confident successful putting, take a video of different length putts rolling into the hole. Watch it over and over until the picture of missed putts in your mind has been replaced.

“Choose What You Desire to Happen

Words create pictures in your mind. The pictures you create with your words, imagination, and visualization are recorded into your memory banks. This is the internal representation of your outside world. You can take control of your life and your golf game by choosing which thoughts you are putting into the data bank of your computer mind.

Using your imagination and ability to daydream, envision what you would like your golf swing to be. Modeling your swing from a golfer you particularly like is a good way to do this. Then project that swing out on to the golf course and see yourself playing the kind of golf you want.

Dreams don’t become reality unless you use your energy to make them come true. The stronger your internal representation is what you want, the easier it will be to produce the golf shots you want.

Remember to let go control of thinking, allow the subconscious mind to perform the dream picture you have installed. The key here is not only relaxing your conscious mind but also your physical body so there is no interference to playing at your peak potential.

How do you perceive your world? Is your cup half empty or half full? What would your world be like if you got up each morning cheerful and joyful and spoke to yourself as a mentally, emotionally, and physically perfect spiritually gifted being?”            

  We perceive the world not as it is, but as we are.

We are each unique and limitless in what we can achieve.

There is no one like each of us on the planet. Because we are unique, we each have our own perceptions of what our world is. Your reality is whatever you decide to make happen in your world. In your golfing world, do you have fun every time you play golf regardless of your score? Or do you spend four or five hours of your valuable time being miserable because you didn’t meet your expectations?”

*Excerpts are from Chapter 2: Understand Your Mind; THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances”

Now available on www.amazon.com and www.createspace.com/6307102

 All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf!

“THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances” explores and explains negative emotions such as fear and performance anxiety, the four Cs of mind blockage, the four progressive stages of learning the supreme intelligence of the heart, and the way to access the zone in a competition. It is a player’s guide for developing your true inner self by returning to the joy and love of self instead of seeking praise and rewards from the outside world.

© PositiveMentalImagery 2017 – All Rights Reserved

Play “in the zone” with Joan

Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances

To train your brain to play your best golf with mental pictures, listen to Positive Mental Imagery self-hypnosis guided imagery CDs in the privacy of your own home, available at www.pmi4.com/cart

If you aren’t able to maintain trust and belief in yourself on the golf course, email Joan at pmi4@bellsouth.net or call 828.696.2547 for a complimentary 15-minute phone consultation about developing a new strategy. Learn what is missing in your golf game so you can achieve the success you desire.

Do you have control of your emotions on the golf course?

“Manage Your Emotions* 

Emotions show what you are thinking about yourself and your golf game. It is the key to understanding and knowing yourself as an individual. It is your heart speaking through your emotions signaling a call to action to bring your body back into balance and peace. Your negative emotions are like a buzzer going off in your heart and brain announcing the arrival of a thought that needs to be cleared out.

Your emotions can interfere with your arousal level, your breathing, your concentration, the tempo of your swing, your decision-making abilities, your confidence, and most of all, the enjoyment of your game. The most detrimental feeling comes from thinking and worrying about what others may think of you and your game. Self-judgment is the quickest and most powerful way to ruin your golf game.”

My physical trainer is an avid golfer who regularly plays with a friend who is a scratch player. My PT told me about his last round where he was even par when his friend mentioned how well he was playing. His game immediately went south and he didn’t know why. His ego was triggered by what his friend thought of his game and he struggled with the fear of not being able to keep it going.

Control of your emotions is the most important part of your mental game. 

All golfers experience many emotions on the golf course. Emotions come from the thoughts in your head. Every time you experience an unpleasant emotion, it is a signal to change your thinking and enhance your self-worth. Here are some ways you can change the way you think about how you play the game of golf so you won’t develop a mental block.

  1. Golf is a game I play for my own enjoyment. I am not concerned with what others might think of my game. Conversely, I am not concerned with how others play their game.
  2. My physical game doesn’t reflect upon me as a person, but my reaction to it does reflect on me as a person. I always act like a champion even when my game goes south. I believe in me.
  3. I see the good in every shot. Mistakes are to learn from. The shots that don’t come off as I desire are for me to learn from so I won’t make the same mistake again. I believe that golf is a game where I will mishit more shots than I hit perfectly. I accept my misses, learn from them, and let them go.
  4. I take enough time to recover well. There are many ways to score well after a mistake.
  5. I congratulate myself when I hit good shots. I feel the euphoric feeling deep within my being.
  6. I trust my preshot routine and do it consistently on every shot. I am confident in what I decide to do.
  7. The only part of my golf game I can control is me. I take the time to prepare my mind for the results I desire.

*Excerpts are from Chapter 7: Emotions; “THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances”

Now available on www.amazon.com and www.createspace.com/6307102

 All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf!

“THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances” explores and explains negative emotions such as fear and performance anxiety, the four Cs of mind blockage, the four progressive stages of learning the supreme intelligence of the heart, and the way to access the zone in competition. It is a player’s guide for developing your true inner self by returning to the joy and love of self instead of seeking praise and rewards from the outside world.

Play “in the zone” with Joan

Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances

To train your brain to play your best golf, listen to Positive Mental Imagery self-hypnosis guided imagery CDs in the privacy of your own home, available at www.pmi4.com/cart

If you aren’t able to maintain belief in yourself on the golf course, email Joan at pmi4@bellsouth.net or call 828.696.2547 for a complimentary 15-minute phone consultation about developing a new strategy. Learn what is missing in your golf game so you can achieve the success you desire.

 

 

 

 

How did Jordan Spieth pull off a miracle win at The Open?

The inner conversation you have with yourself determines whether you will be successful or not.

After winning The British Open at Royal Birkdale on Sunday, Jordan Spieth described his conversation with himself; “Before the round, I thought I have a reputation that I was able to close, but I was hesitant to saying ‘majors’ to myself. I put a lot of pressure on myself unfortunately, and not on purpose, before the round today, just thinking this is the best opportunity I have had since the 2016 Masters.” (He lost a 5-stroke lead with nine holes to play.)

“And if it weren’t going to go my way today, then all I am going to be questioned about and thought about and murmured about is in comparison to that, and that adds a lot of pressure to me,” he said.  In his first four holes on Sunday, Spieth bogeyed three of them. Jordan said that it wasn’t easy because his three-foot putts looked like ten-footers.

Michael, Michael, Michael 

Jordan’s caddy, Michael Greller, took him aside on the 7th hole and reminded him of his July 4th Mexico vacation with Michael Jordan and Michael Phelps. Greller told Jordan that he belonged in that group. He said, “You’re that caliber athlete but I need you to believe that. This is a new tournament. We’re starting over here.”

At the 13th hole Jordan fell behind one stroke for the first time in the tournament when he drove his ball 100 yards right of the fairway, on the practice range. With poise and determination he pulled off a miraculous bogey and his belief in himself kicked in. He almost holed out his approach shot on 14, making birdie. He eagled 15 and birdied 16 to win the Claret Jug and The Open crown by three strokes.

Afterward, Spieth said, “Michael Jordan and Michael Phelps are the greatest to ever do what they did, and I’m not.”

And then Jordan described his self-transformation as, “But if you believe that you are, then you are almost as good as being that. And it is so hard in that situation to believe that, but just having the slightest bit of belief in it makes you so confident.”

Question Your Beliefs 

What you believe is what you will produce in your life.

Our thoughts create our beliefs, our beliefs create our habits, and our habits create our lives.  Unfortunately, many of these thoughts and beliefs do not align with our purpose for experiencing ourselves or our path to success.  Change your beliefs to accept what it is you truly desire even though you haven’t had certain proof.

The Swedish Golf Federation formed their highly successful mental golf program around the belief that it is possible to shoot a perfect score of 54.  While it hasn’t been done yet, the Swedes (and others) are known for believing that it can be done.

Play “in the zone” with Joan

Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances 

To train your brain to play your best golf, listen to Positive Mental Imagery self-hypnosis guided imagery CDs in the privacy of your own home, available at www.pmi4.com/cart

If you aren’t able to maintain trust and belief in yourself on the golf course, email Joan at pmi4@bellsouth.net or call 828.696.2547 for a complimentary 15-minute phone consultation about developing a new strategy. Learn what is missing in your golf game so you can achieve the success you desire. 

A new mental golf book is available now on www.createspace.com/6307102 and www.amazon.com

All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf!

“THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances explores and explains negative emotions such as fear and performance anxiety, the four Cs of mind blockage, the four progressive stages of learning the supreme intelligence of the heart, and the way to access the zone in competition. It is a player’s guide for developing your true inner self by returning to the joy and love of self instead of seeking praise and rewards from the outside world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know how to stay calm under pressure?

Golfers at all levels have pressure at some time on the golf course. Stressful situations can either work for you or against you. If you try too hard it will interfere with your rhythm and coordination and you will lose your motivation. Only hit shots that you know you can pull off. Let go of trying to hit perfect shots.  When you are feeling uncomfortable in a pressure situation, know that you can calm yourself by changing your thoughts. Deep breathing will calm your body and slow down your mind. Know that you are in control of your mind and your emotions and how you interpret the situation.

Here are five mental golf tips to practice for staying calm in a pressure situation.

  1. Think flexibility. The more flexible you are in your thinking, the more control you will have. If you are rigid in your thinking you have limited options. Be ready for anything unexpected that might happen. It is said that golf is a game of recovery. Mistakes happen. Large numbers happen. Three putts happen. Accept what has happened and move on.
  2. Believe in your ability. If you don’t believe that you deserve to play well, you won’t. Belief in yourself and in your ability is what separates the winners from the losers. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking there is something wrong with your golf swing. Thinking will make it so! Believe in your ability no matter what the results are. Trust that you can pull off the shot.
  3. Focus on the task at hand. You have a very active mind. Be decisive! Once you make up your mind don’t change it. Stay in the moment by using a consistent pre-shot routine. Visualize the positive result you want. Thinking negatively leads to a forced, steered swing. See the shot you want, feel the swing, trust it, hit it and enjoy it. Align your focus with the solution and not the problem.
  4. Talk to yourself positively. We all have negative thoughts that we replay in our heads. These are the voices of fear of poor shots we hit in the past, or anxious “what if” thoughts of what we think might happen. To keep your mind in the moment, put all self-talk in positive, present tense, active verbs. Instead of saying “I can make this putt,” tell yourself, “I am making this putt.” To reinforce the affirmation, visualize the putt rolling along the line and dropping in the cup.
  5. Accept your own personality. Most people like to think of themselves as who they would like to be, not whom they really are. You will play your best if you honor your own unique style. Ben Hogan felt most comfortable keeping to himself. Fuzzy Zoeller and Chi Chi Rodriquez felt most comfortable joking and talking to the gallery. Keep your focus on how you are most comfortable. Decide to be yourself. http://bit.ly/Aus4z8

Play “in the zone” with Joan

Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances

If this information was helpful to you, and you want to learn more about how to improve your mental game, call Joan for a complimentary 15-minute consultation. She can be reached by phone at 828.696.2547, or through the Positive Mental Imagery website or blog. Other tips to improve your mental golf game are available on the website, where you can purchase empowering self-hypnosis mental golf CDs. 

A new mental golf book is available now on www.createspace.com/6307102 and www.amazon.com 

All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf!

“THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances” explores and explains negative emotions such as fear and performance anxiety, the four Cs of mind blockage, the four progressive stages of learning the supreme intelligence of the heart, and the way to access the zone in competition. It is a player’s guide for developing your true inner self by returning to the joy and love of self instead of seeking praise and rewards from the outside world.

 

 

 

ARE YOU AFRAID OF MISSING THREE-FOOT PUTTS?

Alexander Victor Schauffele, the rookie PGA Tour player known as Xander Schauffele carded a three-under 67 Sunday, finishing at 14-under par to win the 2017 Greenbrier Classic by one stroke ahead of Robert Streb. The 23-year-old started the final round three shots behind the leader Sebastian Munoz who had led since the first round. On the par-three 18th hole Xander finished strong by hitting his tee shot within three feet of the cup.  He closed strong and got his first career win by sinking the winning birdie putt.

Xander had looked at the leaderboard in front of the 17th green and knew where he stood. He said he was “very nervous” when asked how he had felt just before sinking his final putt. Perhaps his nervousness was caused by thinking he had to sink the putt to win the tournament, or thinking about the $1.28M winner’s prize money, or moving up in the FedExCup standings, or the spots that would be earned in upcoming championships.

A three-foot putt is probably the easiest stroke in golf. It may be the simplest task in all sports. Golfers make it the most difficult by indecision and by thinking fearful thoughts. There is very little movement of the putter back and forth to go wrong in a 3-foot putt. When a golfer’s mind chatter takes over, that is where golf becomes a “mental game.” Because a short putt is such an easy stroke, you think you are supposed to make it. The fear thought of missing and the resultant public embarrassment is what makes it so difficult.

It was interesting to listen to the sports announcers in the booth at the Greenbrier describing the action. Because they were detached from the action, they were able to verbalize what Zander needed to be thinking. They said he should be congratulating himself and feeling good about the great shot he had hit close and for the opportunity to make birdie instead of thinking about what the result might mean.

In a tournament situation you have to train your mind not to think in the future. You have to relax, trust your training and allow your body to Just Do It like you have done hundreds of times before. Xander was aware of his anxiety and said, “I felt very nervous late in the round. I just tried to go back to the basics; close my eyes and take some deep breaths.” It worked.

Keys to overcome nervousness and stay focused on making short putts:

  • Practice 2-3 foot putts until you know you can make them every time.
  • Let go thinking about what missing/making means to you.
  • Change your emotions from nervous and anxious to calm, relaxed, fearless by taking deep breaths.
  • Rehearse the putt in your mind until it is very clear.
  • Focus on the line that maximizes your chances of making the putt.
  • Trust your stroke to roll the ball on the line.
  • Use the same preshot routine every time.
  • Remember that you really love to putt more than the result.

Good putters don’t spend time thinking about missing. They only remember the good putts they made that build their confidence.

Play “in the zone” with Joan

Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances

To train your brain to play your best golf, listen to Positive Mental Imagery self-hypnosis guided imagery CDs in the privacy of your own home, available at www.pmi4.com/cart

If you aren’t able to maintain trust and belief in yourself on the golf course, email Joan at pmi4@bellsouth.net or call 828.696.2547 for a complimentary 15-minute phone consultation about developing a new strategy. Learn what is missing in your golf game so you can achieve the success you desire.

A new mental golf book is available now on www.createspace.com/6307102 and www.amazon.com

 All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf!

“THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances” explores and explains negative emotions such as fear and performance anxiety, the four Cs of mind blockage, the four progressive stages of learning the supreme intelligence of the heart, and the way to access the zone in a competition. It is a player’s guide for developing your true inner self by returning to the joy and love of self instead of seeking praise and rewards from the outside world.

 

 

 

 

What are you thinking that causes inconsistent swings on the golf course?

Amateur and professional golfers alike are frustrated when they hit balls well on the practice range and then play poorly on the golf course. What is different on the golf course? The nice and smooth, compact, rhythmic swing on the range is replaced with a more forceful, longer swing with more body movement as the round progresses.

Most golfers want to be more consistent with their swings in the belief that it will produce lower scores. To do this demands mental and physical practice. This requires mental knowledge and discipline to not speed up during the round. The faster swing might be the result of overconfidence, impatience, or fear. A longer swing might be the result of pressing and wanting to hit the ball further. It is important to maintain a constant tempo and stick with a consistent preshot routine to put you into a confident state to maintain the swing that you spent so much time practicing.

Differences between warming up and playing include:
Ø  On the range there is no penalty for a mishit. When a golfer mishits a shot on the range, s/he just tees up another ball and tries to figure out what went wrong. There is no “second serve” on the golf course. There isn’t a coach to tell you what went wrong.
Ø  Having to count every stroke is stressful. On the range there is nothing to worry about. There are consequences on the course. The consequences on the golf course put pressure on you and cause tension and tightness in your swing. Trying to avoid mistakes causes tension. Trying to make something happen causes stress.
Ø  Golfers worry about the results. A golfer’s emotional state can be ruined by a belief that one bad hole will determine the outcome. On the course, golfers think about results instead of staying in the process of how to achieve what they desire.
Ø  Golfers don’t play the way they practice. On the golf course golfers go through a preshot routine to prepare their minds and bodies for each shot. They rarely get behind the ball and execute a preshot routine on the range. It is important to practice the preshot routine until it becomes a habit. A consistent routine will produce consistent results.
Ø  Golfers forget to have fun on the golf course. Fun and great results happen when a golfer relaxes and trusts that s/he can reproduce what they have practiced and learned. The enjoyment happens when you are totally engrossed in the process of creating the desired shot or putt.

Use your mind to send correct messages to your body

The majority of golfers are deficient in their preshot preparation. Most golfers consider the preshot routine boring, unnecessary, and too much work to develop. Using the same routine every time requires discipline until it becomes a habit. Without a good routine, your results are going to be inconsistent and erratic. It can wreck your score.

Using the same pre-shot routine every time will help you stay focused. Preparing for a shot is like creating a map or a blueprint for what you desire to create. The preshot routine is composed of a series of movements and sensory feelings that give you a way to automatically execute your shots. These routines are the maps that give direction to your brain and body about what you want to do.

When you lose your swing on the golf course, you need to go back to the routine because you have deviated from your map and are going in a different direction and getting a different result. Some of these deviations are fear thoughts of avoiding hazards, fear of embarrassment, fear of failure, frustration at slow play, annoyances from other players, weather conditions and anxiety feelings about your performance or score. Your focus is then on the distractions and not on preparing your mind and body for the shot.

I like to think of the pre-shot routine as a series of actions that move you from behind the ball to the place over the ball where you are eager to swing. When you are concentrating well, you are not thinking. You are totally absorbed in the routine process of getting the ball to the target. When you use the same routine each time, you then have control of your thinking and send correct messages to your body.

A mind that is busy, restless or indecisive will find it difficult to concentrate on an activity. The first step toward improved concentration would be to quiet your mind. When it is your turn to hit, turn on your focus by going into your established pre-shot routine to keep your mind from wandering.

Keys for playing consistently:
Ø  On the range, simulate playing the first three holes. Hit the clubs you will need as you simulate playing the first three holes on the course. This will make you more familiar with playing the course and get you off to a good start.
Ø  Use your preshot routine. Pick your target carefully for each club and go through your preshot routine before every shot. Imagining the golf holes, use the club to play each subsequent shot depending on where the initial one landed.
Ø  Decide to play the game of golf. On the golf course, play golf, not golf swing. Release all tendencies to think about how to create the smooth swing you had on the range. Leave all thoughts of mechanics on the range and if necessary, only think one swing thought during your swing. Concentrate on making solid contact.
Ø  Access your relaxed Arousal Level. Breathe deeply to slow down your busy thinking mind and focus on accessing your tempo. Take your practice swing with your feet together to feel the correct balance and tempo.
Ø  Trust that this process will work for you. Feel it! Believe it! Enjoy it!

Play “in the zone” with Joan
Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances

To train your brain to play your best golf, listen to Positive Mental Imagery self-hypnosis guided imagery CDs in the privacy of your own home. Available at www.pmi4.com/cart

If you aren’t able to maintain trust and believe in yourself on the golf course, email Joan at pmi4@bellsouth.net or call 828.696.2547 for a complimentary 15-minute phone consultation about developing a new strategy. Learn what is missing in your golf game so you can achieve the success you desire.

A new golf book for improving your mental game, “THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances” explores and explains negative emotions such as fear and performance anxiety, the four Cs of mind blockage, the four progressive stages of learning the supreme intelligence of the heart, and the way to access the zone in competition. It is a player’s guide for developing your true inner self. It shows how to trust and use abilities that you know you have, and to have fun doing it.

Available now on http://www.createspace.com/6307102and http://www.amazon.com

All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf!

 

 

 

 

 

Do you focus on the process or the outcome when playing golf?

“Outcome vs. Process Thinking*

Focusing on the process means staying in the moment, concentrating on one shot at a time, and thinking only about the things you can control. Process-oriented golfers know they cannot control anything outside of themselves. Process-oriented golf means thinking about what you want to do (the process of doing it) versus worrying about where your shot will go or what will happen (the outcome of your score).

Focusing on results means that golfers think about the trouble on the golf course and the consequences of mishits. Their concentration then wanders to “what-if” thinking, which causes tension and anxiety and creates the mishit the golfer is trying to avoid.

Examples of outcome thinking are; trying to shoot a certain score, trying to better your lowest score, trying to hit a certain number of fairways or greens, trying to have a certain number of putts, or trying to avoid penalty strokes. The ability of the golfer to stay in the moment on every shot and putt allows that player to perform at peak performance level.

Mental tips for focusing on the process are the following:

  • Be aware when you are feeling anxious. It is a sign that your mind is wandering into outcomes.
  • relax your mind between shots.
  • Engage with your preshot routine.
  • Believe in your club selection and target.
  • Visualize and feel the shot.
  • Maintain your arousal level.
  • Take a deep breath to relax before and after each shot.

Golf is a game that is played for the unlimited challenges that it provides. To play at your personal best means to play for the fun and love of the game. Choose to play for the challenge of each shot (process oriented), and do not let the pressure to perform for the score (results oriented) determine your round.

You can enjoy your results afterward at the 19th hole.”

Play “in the zone” with Joan

Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances

*Excerpts are from Chapter 15: Concentration; “THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances”

Now available on www.createspace.com/6307102 and www.amazon.com

 All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf!

© PositiveMentalImagery 2017– All Rights Reserved

To build your confidence and train your brain to play your best golf, listen to Positive Mental Imagery self-hypnosis guided imagery CDs in the privacy of your own home, available at www.pmi4.com/cart

If you aren’t able to maintain present focus on the golf course, email Joan at pmi4@bellsouth.net or call 828.696.2547 for a complimentary 15-minute phone consultation about developing a new strategy. Learn what is missing in your golf game so you can achieve the success you desire.

 

 

 

How can I handle a “bad day” on the golf course?

If frustration with your golf game turns into anger, your situation will become worse. Anger is only a temporary motivator resulting from a fear of failure. Anger releases the hormone adrenaline causing your muscles to tighten. Tight muscles produce a jerky uncontrolled swing causing miss-hits. The angrier you get, the more mistakes you make, confirming that you really are playing poorly.

Accept that there are going to be days when you feel that you aren’t in control of your mind and/or golf swing and use the following several ways to regain physical control.

  1. Don’t think about correcting your golf swing. Take practice swings to feel and regain your tempo and timing.
  2. Focus instead on the smooth pace of the swing. Stay balanced, steady and centered over the ball.
  3. Breathe deeply to relax your muscles and to slow down your brain waves for a sharper focus.
  4. Don’t swing harder than you can control. Swing at 80% of your power.
  5. Have a clear picture of your target in your mind. Swing down your target line without thinking about how to do it.

Use the following mental strategies for planning your shot before you start your pre-shot routine, not while you are standing over the ball.

  1. Change all negative thoughts to decisive confident thoughts.
  2. Let go of all good or bad expectations. Don’t add up your score until you are finished.
  3. Remember the good shots you hit in previous rounds.
  4. When you miss a shot, make sure you can recover. Think the shot through. Play only percentage shots.
  5. Stay patient and don’t give up. The game can turn around on the next shot.
  6. Convince yourself that the club in your hand is the perfect club for that shot.
  7. Let go of previously missed shots by planning your next shot.
  8. Commit yourself 100% to each shot. Give every shot full preparation of what you intend to make happen. This is what it means to “hit one shot at a time,” and to “stay in the moment.”

Play “in the zone” with Joan

Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances

If you aren’t able to maintain a positive mental attitude on the golf course, email me at pmi4@bellsouth.net or call 828.696.2547 for a complimentary 15-minute phone consultation about developing a new strategy. Learn what is missing in your golf game so you can achieve the success you desire. Ask about my 4 C’s program to overcome a lack of Control, Confidence, Concentration, and Consistency in your golf game.

To train your brain to play your best golf, listen to Positive Mental Imagery self-hypnosis guided imagery CDs in the privacy of your own home. Eight golf CDs are available at www.pmi4.com/cart

Available now is a complete golfer’s guide for developing the mental skills to play in the zone. “THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances” is available at www.createspace.com/6307102 and www.amazon.com  All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf.

Do you need help with your mental golf game?

It has been my pleasure to share my insights into the mental game of golf from decades of research and personal experience from competing in national and international amateur women’s golf championships.

The information I have written about is entirely about the mental-emotional-spiritual aspects to the game of golf because I believe that knowing your inner self is the secret to great golf. There is no information about the mechanical parts of the golf swing.

My main purpose in starting my business was to promote the game as a way to have fun which then resulted in lower scoring. I have found that the best way to do this is to show you the steps you need to learn to access “the zone state” where the game is easy and you play your best without effort.

If you haven’t visited the PositiveMentalImagery.com website lately, I would like to invite you to log on at www.pmi4.com The PMI website is dedicated to you and to your self-awareness for success in performing at your peak performance level on the golf course.

On the website you will find:

  • Q&A from my clients about mental golf that you have always wondered about.
  • 18 published articles about different facets of the mind game.
  • 183 monthly mental golf newsletters from 1999-2017.
  • 7 self-hypnosis golf CDs to improve your mental game.

New information about the mental game of golf is added weekly on the PMI blog. You can access all the weekly mental golf tips blogs from 2011-2017 at www.pmi4.com/blog. Each blog and newsletter have a title along with the date so you can easily find the information you require.

I have produced eight self-hypnosis imagery golf CDs that were requested by my clients to power up their mental beliefs and attitudes. They are available at www.pmi4.com/cart  The cost of the CDs has not changed since 1992. For more personalized help, I create a 30-minute personalized self-hypnosis CD for you to overcome your blocks and regain the confidence in the game you know you are capable of.

Also at the request of my clients I have published “THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances”  that guides you through the learning levels necessary to put you into the zone state of euphoria where you play from your heart for peak performances that occur without the struggle, thinking or effort. All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf. It is available at www.createspace.com/6307102 and www.amazon.com

If you aren’t able to maintain a positive mental attitude on the golf course, email me at pmi4@bellsouth.net or call 828.696.2547 for a complimentary 15-minute phone consultation about developing a new strategy. Learn what is missing in your golf game so you can achieve the success you desire. Ask about my 4 C’s program to overcome a lack of Control, Confidence, Concentration, and Consistency in your golf game.

Play “in the zone” with Joan

Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances

 

 

 

 

 

Do you hold your breath when you swing your golf club?

“Don’t Forget to Breathe* 

Most golfers say that they do hold their breath when they are swinging. Pay attention to how you breathe. Holding your breath causes more tension, which inhibits your smooth motion.

Less tension creates faster club head speed. Increased club head speed means more distance.

If you are someone who works out, you know that to lift weights easier, you breathe out for extra energy as you lift the weight, and breathe in as you lower the weight. In any athletic performance involving resistance, breathing out through the hardest part of the effort allows you to perform it easier and better.

Watch tennis players who take a deep breath before they serve, basketball players before shooting a free throw, and baseball pitchers who do the same to relax.

Just as tennis players and weight lifters audibly grunt as they exhale, you can get more distance on your drives by exhaling through your downswing.

If your abdominal area is not filling up with air when you inhale, you are not breathing the most efficient way for your mental, emotional, and physical coordination and health.

Under stress you breathe high in your chest, which means that only half of the capacity of the lungs is being used. The air is only moving out from the top half of the lungs. Fresh oxygen is coming in to fill it all up when you use the entire lungs. The brain is then more fully oxygenated. This requires proper movement of the diaphragm downward.

In natural breathing the abdomen moves outward (not in) when inhaling and moves down toward the spine when exhaling. The chest remains still. When that happens, the air in the abdomen is forced out of the way by coming forward. When you breathe this way you are taking full advantage of your lung capacity. You will have more energy and less fatigue. You will be more focused, your memory will be enhanced, and your muscular tension will be reduced.

When we breathe in we inhale oxygen and we breathe out carbon dioxide, which is a waste product of cellular respiration during the production of energy. The golf course is a wonderful place to energize your body as the trees take in your carbon dioxide waste and give off life-enhancing oxygen for you to inhale.

*Excerpts are from Chapter 10: Deep Breathing; “THE HEART OF GOLF, Access Your Supreme Intelligence for Peak Performances”

Now available on www.createspace.com/6307102 and www.amazon.com

                                   All royalties will be donated to Junior Golf!

© PositiveMentalImagery 2017– All Rights Reserved

To build your confidence and train your brain to play your best golf, listen to Positive Mental Imagery self-hypnosis guided imagery CDs in the privacy of your own home, available at www.pmi4.com/cart

If you aren’t able to maintain present focus on the golf course, email Joan at pmi4@bellsouth.net or call 828.696.2547 for a complimentary 15-minute phone consultation about developing a new strategy. Learn what is missing in your golf game so you can achieve the success you desire.